Read Mark Twain's letter to his daughter, in which he pretends to be Santa

Read Mark Twain’s letter to his daughter, in which he pretends to be Santa

Dec 20, 2012

Yesterday, Letters of Note uncovered this letter Mark Twain left for his three-year-old daughter Susie on Christmas Morning 1875. It’s full of imagination and good will to those in need, as well as very detailed instructions for how to receive a trunk full of doll clothes Susie may or may not have requested in her letter to Santa. It’s delightful to read—take a look here.

Palace of St. Nicholas.
In the Moon.
Christmas Morning.

My dear Susie Clemens:

I have received and read all the letters which you and your little sister have written me by the hand of your mother and your nurses; I have also read those which you little people have written me with your own hands—for although you did not use any characters that are in grown peoples’ alphabet, you used the characters that all children in all lands on earth and in the twinkling stars use; and as all my subjects in the moon are children and use no character but that, you will easily understand that I can read your and your baby sister’s jagged and fantastic marks without any trouble at all. But I had trouble with those letters which you dictated through your mother and the nurses, for I am a foreigner and cannot read English writing well. You will find that I made no mistakes about the things which you and the baby ordered in your own letters—I went down your chimney at midnight when you were asleep and delivered them all myself—and kissed both of you, too, because you are good children, well trained, nice mannered, and about the most obedient little people I ever saw. But in the letter which you dictated there were some words which I could not make out for certain, and one or two small orders which I could not fill because we ran out of stock. Our last lot of kitchen furniture for dolls has just gone to a very poor little child in the North Star away up, in the cold country above the Big Dipper. Your mama can show you that star and you will say: “Little Snow Flake,” (for that is the child’s name) “I’m glad you got that furniture, for you need it more than I.” That is, you must write that, with your own hand, and Snow Flake will write you an answer. If you only spoke it she wouldn’t hear you. Make your letter light and thin, for the distance is great and the postage very heavy.

Read the rest over at Letters of Note, one of our favorite single-serving websites which is dedicated to publishing “correspondence deserving of a wider audience.”

Around the Web
Comments