Here’s all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Sometime in the 1990s, Bruce Willis and then-wife Demi Moore joined the celebrity scene booming in Sun Valley, Idaho. This would have been somewhere between the releases of “Die Hard 2″ and “Die Hard With a Vengeance.” Ah, the ’90s. It was a different time, when there was so much money floating around that it wasn’t enough to have celebrity hotspots just in exotic places like St. Barts, we needed to have them in Idaho, too. Anyway, you know the rest of the story—Willis and Moore divorced in 2000, Moore started a relationship with Ashton Kutcher and Bruce Willis… Well, he kept playing with his band, The Accelerators, at the bar and nightclub he owns in Idaho, The Mint.

Willis has since remarried as well, and The Mint is currently for sale, along with a bunch of other Willis-owned stuff in Idaho. Now, AP reports that Willis is just plain giving some of it away. Let’s take a la look at what’s of offer:

1. HOUSE
Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Casa Willis, located in Hailey, Idaho, went on the market last year for $15 million. The AP notes it comes complete with a guest house, a gym, and a pool with water slides. Water slides.

2. NIGHTCLUB

Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

The best thing about owning your own bar and nightclub is that your band can always gets a gig. Locals have reported seeing The Accelerators play The Mint within the last couple years. The Mint went on the market last year for $6 million. The price has since been lowered to $4 million, in case you have a spare $4 million laying around and are just dying to own a club in Idaho.

3. SKI MOUNTAIN

Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Here's all the stuff Bruce Willis is selling or giving away in Idaho

Yep, he’s got one of those too. Apparently Soldier Mountain, which Willis’ Soldier Mountain Development runs, has been operating at a loss in rncent years. Now, rather than trying to sell it, the AP reports Willis wants to give the mountain to a non-profit. “Transferring ownership to a nonprofit entity would allow for tax-deductible donations to keep the operation afloat,” writes the AP.

One benefit of being run by a nonprofit is that it would probably continue to keep the mountain’s relatively moderate admission prices down, so you if you run a nonprofit and are interested in a ski mountain, hit him up.