Utah declares porn a public health hazard

Back in Feburary, I told you about “S.C.R. 9 Concurrent Resolution on the Public Health Crisis,” a proposed piece of Utah legislation that would officially define pornography as a “public health hazard,” presumably to spur further government action on the subject. Now that bill has passed the state’s house and senate, making the state of emergency official.

Signed by Governor Gary Herbert on Tuesday, the non-binding resolution declares pornography “a public health hazard leading to a broad spectrum of individual and public health impacts and societal harms” and calls for “education, prevention, research, and policy change at the community and societal level in order to address the pornography epidemic that is harming the citizens of Utah and the nation.” At least there’s nothing in there about banning masturbation.

As I previously explained, the resolution is based partly on pseudoscience and takes for granted that the only “healthy” channel for sexuality is a non-kinky, heterosexual, child-producing marriage. It also blames porn for such broad social ills as “objectification of women,” “risky sexual behavior among teens,” “infidelity” and “violence, abuse and rape,” as if porn shapes society and never the other way around. Finally, it takes the agency (and hence the blame) away from god-fearing Utah citizens for the fact that they consume so much online porn by calling it “biologically addictive” and claiming that people must progress to more “extreme” forms of pornography to keep getting the same high from it. How can these poor onanists — or the repressive religious society they live in — be responsible for their habits when porn is more addictive than cocaine?

From there, it’s a slippery slope to full on rape-murder.

Via Utah Public Radio:

The resolution makes way for a multifaceted approach to solving this crisis, said Pamela Atkinson, the chair of the Utah Coalition Against Pornography board.

She said the state is worried about 82 percent of sex offenders who started off by viewing pornography.

“They acknowledged they got involved with simple–or soft core porn–years ago,” she said. “It’s not so satisfying anymore and that’s when they move on to the hard core porn. When that is not satisfying any more, they act out on real human beings. They objectify children and young women.”

The bill doesn’t ban pornography (which would likely be unconstitutional) or dole out any money to deal with its alleged ill effects, but its architects are calling it a symbolic victory over the evil forces of explicit content.

Countdown to one of these dudes getting caught with his dick in a glory hole.

[UPR | photo: Getty]