Fast Food Lies: They’re Supersized

“People around the world know fast food as one of the most reliable distributors of disappointment ever produced by the business world.”

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast food is a staple of modern American culture. You can find a fix on every street corner—McDonald’s, Burger King, White Castle, KFC, Jack In The Box, Wendy’s, etc.–the list goes on and on. What started as a convenience—good tasting reasonably priced food made quickly for people one the go—turned out to be an egregious stain on modern culture responsible for nationwide obesity, heart disease, food addiction, and death.

Fast food companies lie. They lie about their health statistics, they lie about ingredients, they lie about how the food is prepared, and now it has been proven that they about what their food looks like—surprise!

Photographer Dario DiNatale recently conducted a test to prove that fast food companies are using false advertising. To prove this, DiNatale took images of food from fast food advertisements and placed them on his computer screen. He then bought the same food and photographed it in his studio trying to make the food look as close to the advertisement as he could.

The results were no surprise. The food that DiNatale bought looked nothing like the food from the advertisements, nor did the food look like anything that could come out of a food establishment—fast food or not.

DiNatale then went back to the fast food joints and asked that the employees make his burger the exact size of the one pictured on the menu. The result was as dismal has the original burger.

After testing his theory at McDonald’s, DiNatale realized that the Big Mac’s advertised on the menu would not even be able to fit in the boxes designed for Big Mac’s. DiNatale also tested McDonald’s Angus Deluxe Third Pounder, same result—the advertised burger would never be able to fit into the designed box. “To me, what these box-tests establish is that these two burgers not only don’t look like the ads, but physically CAN’T.”

Miraculously, this is not false advertising in the legal sense. According to the law, in order to prove false advertising, a plaintiff must prove five things:

  1. A false statement of fact has been made about the advertiser’s own or another person’s goods, services, or commercial activity.
  2. The statement either deceives or has the potential to deceive a substantial portion of its targeted audience.
  3. The deception is also likely to affect the purchasing decisions of its audience.
  4. The advertising involves goods or services in interstate commerce; and
  5. The deception has either resulted in or is likely to result in injury to the plaintiff.

It can be argued that fast food ads meet the first four requirements for false advertising. However, it does not meet the last requirement, which not surprisingly holds the most weight when taken into account.

An ethical crime, but technically legal—fast Food establishments pump you up with colorful promises meant to entice, then when it comes time to deliver on those promises, the companies utterly fail to deliver. It’s a wonder the CEO’s of these chains haven’t gone into politics.

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized

Fast Food Lies: They're Supersized