How to Use Google Translator as a Beat Box

Google Translator can now be magically transformed into Google Beatbox.

How to Use Google Translator as a Beat Box

pv zk pv pv zk pv zk kz zk pv pv pv zk pv zk zk pzk pzk pvzkpkzvpvzk kkkkkk bsch

Mere unpronounceable gibberish when read in English. However, when translated from German to German on Google Translator, it makes for a rather excellent beat pattern. Reddit.com recently made this discovery on their “Today I Learned” section, posting “TIL how to make Google beatbox for you” with the directions:

1) Go to Google Translate

2) Set the translator to translate German to German

3) Copy + paste the following into the translate box: pv zk pv pv zk pv zk kz zk pv pv pv zk pv zk zk pzk pzk pvzkpkzvpvzk kkkkkk bsch

4) Click “listen”

5) Be amazed 🙂

Needless to say, I am. For whatever reason, the automated pronunciation voice on Google responds very well to the combining of consonants, where as the vocal translators for most other languages enunciates the letters individually which would certainly harsh your flow. While this combination printed above is a good reference point, tons of combos can be used to give you a great breakbeat. Each letter combo makes for a different part of the drumkit or drum pattern. For instance, “bschk” is a snare, and “kttp” is a flam tap.

Recently, Damon Albarn bragged that he wants to be the first musician to make an album completely on an iPad, which very well may be in the mastering phase now. I’m hoping that more people will take the cue from Albarn, and begin using more and more brand spanking new technology to make new music, in this case, a song or record using only Google Beatbox as a backing track. It can be done, and it could be you (if I don’t beat you to it first.)