Poll: 39% of voters who think Benghazi is a scandal don't know where it is

Poll: 39% of voters who think Benghazi is a scandal don’t know where it is

May 15, 2013

One of the lessons learned from Charles Pierce’s 2010 bestseller “Idiot America” is that, no matter how untrue or distorted your message may be, as long as you say it loud enough, people will listen — even though they have no idea what you’re talking about.

It’s no news that Couch Potato Nation has been conditioned to believe whatever comes through their TV sets and monitors. So, when a certain major news network harps on a snafu across the Atlantic and pushes negligence to the point of corruption — i.e., when Fox News attaches the word “scandal” to their every news item related to the attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi — Americans mindlessly nod at the fancy people talking on their screens. Pierce wonders in his book (and repeatedly in his Esquire political column) why Nixon had his ratfuckers break into the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters to scoop dirt on his opposing presidential candidates. Why didn’t he just lie his ass off and make a bunch of shit up instead?

I digress. The point here is that Pierce’s theory is proven once again in a new Public Policy Poll that found 41% of Americans believe the attack on Benghazi “to be the biggest political scandal in American history” while a near-equal 43% “disagree with that sentiment.” But ready for the kicker? A whopping 39% of those 41% who think the attack is a historical blow to the nation have no idea where in the hell Benghazi is in the first place.

According to PPP:

  • 9% in Iran.
  • 6% in Cuba.
  • 5% in Syria.
  • 4% in Iraq.
  • 1% each in North Korea and Liberia.
  • 4% not willing to venture a guess.

Shaking my head. Now, I’m not saying for a second that the White House should be given a clean slate for all the shit that’s been surfacing in the Executive Branch this week, but let’s at least try to get facts straight that are within our grasp. Whaddya say?

h/t Esquire


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